The Worst Coworker Ever – Parts 5 and 6

I spend most of my time on this blog trying to give tips and tricks on how to improve as a technical writer. But at times, we simply need examples of what not to do. Today, we conclude the story of the worst technical writing coworker I’ve ever dealt with. Out of respect for those involved, names have been changed. Out of respect for you, everything else is told exactly as it occurred. The six-part series ends here.

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The Worst Coworker Ever – Parts 3 and 4

I spend most of my time on this blog trying to give tips and tricks on how to improve as a technical writer. But at times, we simply need examples of what not to do. Today, we continue the story of the worst technical writing coworker I’ve ever dealt with. Out of respect for those involved, names have been changed. Out of respect for you, everything else is told exactly as it occurred. The six-part series continues here.

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The Worst Coworker Ever – Parts 1 and 2

I spend most of my time on this blog trying to give tips and tricks on how to improve as a technical writer. Today, we’re going to go in a different direction. Today, I’m going to begin the story of the worst technical writing coworker I’ve ever dealt with. Out of respect for those involved, names have been changed. Out of respect for you, everything else is told exactly as it occurred. The six-part series begins here.

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Technical Writing Career Paths

choice

When I first told people I became a technical writer, there was one question that came up time and time again. “What do you want to do? You know… after?” At first, the question baffled me. There was an after? What was my next career step? Am I going to be a technical writer forever? Is that okay? If you’re there too, take some deep breaths with me. There may not be one answer, but here are a few jumping off points to consider.

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3 Ways You’re Measuring Technical Writing Wrong

Tape measure

In the technical writing world, defining performance is often difficult. For some, especially those under government contracts, service level agreements require that performance be measurable. These measurements can determine whether a writer is praised or docked based on performance. While there is no right answer for everyone, here are some suggestions for what not to measure.

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